This section explains how to network a Supermicro 114S cluster, lists the networking prerequisites, outlines the recommended configuration, and explains how to connect to redundant switches or to a single switch.

Prerequisites

Your node requires the following resources.

  • A network switch with the following specifications:

    • 100 Gbps Ethernet

    • Fully non-blocking architecture

    • IPv6 capability

  • Compatible networking cables

  • A sufficient number of ports for connecting all nodes to the same switch fabric

  • One static IP per node, per defined VLAN

The Supermicro 1114S platform uses a networking configuration in which different NICs handle back-end and front-end traffic. You can connect the front-end and back-end NICs to the same switch or to different switches. However, for greater reliability, we recommend connecting all four 100 Gbps ports on every node: Connect both front-end NIC ports to the front-end switch and both back-end NIC ports to the back-end switch.

We recommend the following configuration for your node.

  • Your Qumulo front-end MTU configured to match your client environment

  • One set of redundant switches for the back-end network (9,000 MTU minimum)

  • One physical connection per node, per each redundant switch

  • One Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) port-channel per network (front-end and back-end) on each node, with the following configuration

    • Active mode

    • Slow transmit rather

    • Access port or trunk port with a native VLAN

  • DNS servers

  • A Network Time Protocol (NTP) server

  • Firewall protocols or ports allowed for proactive monitoring

  • Where N is the number of nodes, N-1 floating IPs per node, per client-facing VLAN

Connecting to Redundant Switches

For redundancy, we recommend connecting a Supermicro 1114S cluster to dual switches. If either switch becomes inoperative, the cluster is still be accessible from the remaining switch.

  • Front End

    • Connect the two front-end NIC ports (2 × 100 Gbps) on your nodes to separate switches.

    • The uplinks to the client network must equal the bandwidth from the cluster to the switch.

    • The two ports form an LACP port channel by using a multi-chassis link aggregation group.

  • Back End

    • Connect the two back-end NIC ports (2 × 100 Gbps) on your nodes to separate switches.

    • Use an appropriate inter-switch link or virtual port channel.

  • Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP)

    • For all connection speeds, the default behavior is that of an LACP with 1,500 MTU for the front-end and 9,000 MTU for the back-end interfaces.

Connecting to a Single Switch

You can connect a Supermicro 1114S cluster to a single switch. If this switch becomes inoperative, the entire cluster becomes inaccessible.

  • Front End

    • Connect the two front-end NIC ports (2 × 100 Gbps) to a single switch.

    • The uplinks to the client network must equal the bandwidth from the cluster to the switch.

    • The two ports form an LACP port channel.

  • Back End

    • Connect the two band-end ports (2 × 100 Gbps) to a single switch.
  • Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP)

    • For all connection speeds, the default behavior is that of an LACP with 1,500 MTU for the front-end and 9,000 MTU for the back-end interfaces.

Four-Node Cluster Architecture Diagram

The following is the recommended configuration for a four-node cluster connected to an out-of-band management switch, redundant front-end switches, and redundant back-end switches.

Four-Node Cluster Architecture Diagram